Posts from March 2012

“LET’S RIGHT THE SHIP”

March 29, 2012

Rich multi-sensory media — designed for learning — has been with us for more than three decades. Interactive Laser Videodisc (IVD), CD-ROM, DVD, and even interactive videotape were the pioneering technologies. Today, it seems that we’ve centered on E-Learning as the multi-sensory delivery medium of choice. And, yet, E-Learning is singularly failing to deliver on the promise so brilliantly achieved by these earlier multi-sensory technologies. The ultimate positive results of effective training...

“CRITICAL ERRORS, part two”

March 27, 2012

Following up on this past Thursday’s blog, we’re now ready to address the second “killer” mistake. In many ways, the arguments are similar to the one’s we made last week — only this time the fatal mistake comes, initially, from a trusted employee or customer. It often originates when an educator or a trainer listens to a respected colleague, who expresses some idea that — on the surface — has validity. Or,...

“THE BIGGEST ERRORS”

March 22, 2012

Today and next Tuesday we are going to look at the two “fatal mistakes” corporate training departments and training vendors make. And, “fatal” is not an exaggeration when discussing the many otherwise technology-smart people who come up with exciting ideas but drown in their own ocean of misguided premises. I cannot begin to enumerate the number of great concepts and brilliant adaptations of technology that I have seen fail. For example, someone...

“DESIGN IS THE KEY”

March 20, 2012

Today, the E-Learning world must be viewed with caution.  The opportunities provided by this potentially powerful training medium are being mitigated by the preponderance of adapted PowerPoints and converted written procedures.  Consequently, E-Learning is being compromised by these word-heavy “information” programs — all far removed from effective learning principles.   Ultimately, E-Learning’s future lies with knowledgeable Instructional Designers who can return training to the learning-richness of the Interactive Laser Videodisc and CD-ROM...

“THANK YOU, DEREK!”

March 15, 2012

Last week, I received an interesting e-Mail from Derek Singleton, an analyst who covers the job shop manufacturing software industry, derek@softwareadvice.com. Derek, evidently a sometimes reader of this blog, wanted me to examine the ideas he was postulating in regard to overcoming the skills gap in manufacturing. Specifically, he advocated three possible solutions and the following italicized sections are his opinions (along with my own comments which are set off with parentheses):...

E-LEARNING: A CAUTIONARY TALE

March 13, 2012

In training conferences and meetings throughout the country, the arguments over “best learning medium” are becoming commercially meaningless today. Why? Because most large, and many medium-size, companies have already decided the issue. For a variety of reasons, these corporations have chosen “E-Learning” as the training medium of choice — and, that’s that! The efficiencies born out of “anytime/anywhere,” reduced travel, and labor savings have all pointed in one direction — E-Learning. The...

“MUTUAL TRUST”

March 8, 2012

In meeting your training initiative obligations, you will be investing in various training vendors and their sales representatives. But, will you be able to trust the salesperson who is assigned your account? If you can (and, I hope that’s the case) you will be working with a salesperson who is honest, has integrity and truly cares about your needs and your problems. The creation of a consistent atmosphere of “mutual trust” will...

“EVOLUTION IN LEARNING”

March 6, 2012

Without something resembling a liberal arts education — combined with an extensive vocabulary — in-depth thinking becomes restricted. Without the skills training one receives in high school and college, as well as from corporate training departments, the ability to excel in one’s chosen career becomes limited. In terms of the former, most individuals are on their own, as a liberal arts education becomes more and more de-emphasized. No worry, however, for those...

“MANUFACTURING PERSPECTIVES”

March 1, 2012

Compared to many other countries, American front-line workers lag far behind in the sophisticated skills needed in order for a country to compete internationally: communications, math, science, conceptual thinking, flexibility, responsiveness, and technological expertise. These are skills that most front-line workers in Japan and European nations like Germany possess, to the ultimate economic benefit of their countries. What these other nations have learned about education and the workforce has been translated into...